The beautiful, sad, shifting state of wild ice: Geomorphologist / photographer James Balog travels the globe to capture the twisting, soaring forms of the world’s vanishing wild ice. In 2009, he wowed the TEDGlobal crowd with his time-lapse photos of the shifting landscapes of the world’s icy habitats.

Above, some striking footage from his project Extreme Ice Survey.

Watch the whole talk here»

In which a scientist is mistaken for a giant fish 

Marine biologist Helen Scales was in the South China sea studying Napoleon wrasse, a rare and endangered coral reef giant, when a six-foot wrasse charged her, ready to mate.

This well-meaning, but mistaken wrasse is one of the many endangered creatures Helen researches in a part of our world that most of us hardly ever see — the one beneath the waves. At TEDxLSE, Helen shared stories of this watery world, reminding us why it needs protection:

Human actions are ruining the oceans like never before. And the only way we’re going to change that, I think, is if people know about and care for some of the things that live there — and what better place to start than to have your mind spin with stories of real sea monsters?

Hear more of her stories here »

(Above: Top: tetzl, Middle: Saspotato:, Bottom: ollographic)

How to live with grizzly bears without getting eaten

The object of TEDxCanmore speaker Steve Michel’s affection is a rather unusual choice — one of the most notoriously feared animals in the natural world. He calls her grizzly bear number 64, and she lives with her cubs in Banff National Park where Michel is leading a team to educate people about living in harmony with wildlife. 

What we interpret as aggression, he says at TEDxCanmore, is often self-protection. For example, grizzly bear number 64 brings her cubs to the edge of a golf course not to scare us (as we might assume), but to keep her cubs safe from stronger, meaner bears (as any good mother would). In this fascinating talk, Michel explains how a little understanding can make these feared creatures seem as a sweet as the Berenstain bears. 

Watch the full talk here »

Ice, ice baby — the beautiful, sad, shifting state of wild ice

Geomorphologist / photographer James Balog travels the globe to capture the twisting, soaring forms of the world’s vanishing wild ice. In 2009, he wowed the TEDGlobal crowd with his time-lapse photos of the shifting landscapes of the world’s icy habitats.

Above, some striking footage from his project Extreme Ice Survey, which caught the Ilulissat glacier in Greenland breaking up.

Watch the whole talk here»