Watch the whole talk here»

John Dehlin is a practicing Mormon … and an outspoken activist for LGBTQ rights. In this touching talk at TEDxUSU, John shares how a friendship with an openly gay coworker changed his views on homosexuality and led him to a career in psychology.

In his research, John looks at the complex, often-prickly relationship between religion and sexuality. Here, he shares some of his findings — heartbreaking statistics about how negative feelings toward sexuality and attempts to “fix” same-sex attraction inspire suicides and teen homelessness.


Teenagers offer a lot. A lot of times, people think of teenagers as not caring, and that’s a big mistake. We do care about a lot of things, we just don’t know where to start. — Julia Bluhm

Julia Bluhm is a teenager who offers a lot. At just 14, fed up with seeing her friends stress over trying to be like the girls they saw in magazines, Julia and friend Izzy started an online petition protesting the overuse of Photoshop in Seventeen magazine.
What started out small soon gained momentum. Within days, the petition had over 25,000 signatures. After a month, Julia was outside Seventeen magazine headquarters presenting a petition that now had over 84,000 signatures.
In the end, her efforts paid off — Seventeen magazine issued a Body Peace Treaty, signed by all the editors, agreeing to show real, un-Photoshopped girls in their pages.
Julia and Izzy dominated TEDxWomen last year with their story, showing how to be a super, A+, no-nonsense, clever, ever-questioning, butt-kicking, media monitor — no matter your age. You can watch their talk here.
And for more evidence why you should never underestimate a teenager with a cause, read our interview with Julia on the TED Blog.

Teenagers offer a lot. A lot of times, people think of teenagers as not caring, and that’s a big mistake. We do care about a lot of things, we just don’t know where to start. 
— Julia Bluhm

Julia Bluhm is a teenager who offers a lot. At just 14, fed up with seeing her friends stress over trying to be like the girls they saw in magazines, Julia and friend Izzy started an online petition protesting the overuse of Photoshop in Seventeen magazine.

What started out small soon gained momentum. Within days, the petition had over 25,000 signatures. After a month, Julia was outside Seventeen magazine headquarters presenting a petition that now had over 84,000 signatures.

In the end, her efforts paid off — Seventeen magazine issued a Body Peace Treaty, signed by all the editors, agreeing to show real, un-Photoshopped girls in their pages.

Julia and Izzy dominated TEDxWomen last year with their story, showing how to be a super, A+, no-nonsense, clever, ever-questioning, butt-kicking, media monitor — no matter your age. You can watch their talk here.

And for more evidence why you should never underestimate a teenager with a cause, read our interview with Julia on the TED Blog.

Above, some of our 2013 TEDxYouthDay Reporters show how they spark change in their communities. 

Here at TEDx, we’re super excited for next week’s TEDxYouthDay!

Nearly 100 events will take place all over the world on November 16-17,and many of them are being organized by youth, for youth. How awesome is that?

Leading up to TEDxYouthDay, we have a challenge for you. For our photo campaign, we’re asking you to complete the sentence, "I will spark change by…"

If you take a picture of yourself holding the TEDxYouthDay sign and telling the world what you’re doing to spark change, you could wind up on the official TEDxYouthDay site, or on this blog!

What you do: Download the sign here, print it out, write your answer, and take a picture of yourself holding your sign.

Then what? Upload your picture to Flickr, Instagram, or Tumblr, and tag it with #TEDxYouth. If it’s especially awesome, we’ll add it to our posts.

So tell us: How will you spark change?


"We need more men with the guts, the courage, the strength, and the moral integrity to break our complicit silence and challenge each other to stand with women, not against them."—Jackson Katz, "Violence against women — it’s a men’s issue."

Hello, Tumblr! Today at 3 PM EST, we’re holding a live Twitter chat with Jackson Katz, the educator, filmmaker, and anti-sexist activist whose moving TEDx talk re-framed the common conversation on gender violence and prompted Upworthy to say it’ll "change any man into a feminist."
Today, WE WANT YOU to get on Twitter and ask Jackson the questions on your mind regarding domestic violence, male culture, gender violence, really, anything you want.
Ask him what we can do to stop victim blaming in cases of sexual assault, violence, and abuse; ask him who his favorite activist is; ask him how to talk to someone who is making degrading or sexist comments; ask him what he hopes for future generations; ask him whatever your heart desires.
Follow the whole chat using the hashtag #TEDxChat or check out our feed on @TEDx. 
We hope you’ll join us today at 3 PM EST!

"We need more men with the guts, the courage, the strength, and the moral integrity to break our complicit silence and challenge each other to stand with women, not against them."
—Jackson Katz, "Violence against women — it’s a men’s issue."


Hello, Tumblr! Today at 3 PM EST, we’re holding a live Twitter chat with Jackson Katz, the educator, filmmaker, and anti-sexist activist whose moving TEDx talk re-framed the common conversation on gender violence and prompted Upworthy to say it’ll "change any man into a feminist."

Today, WE WANT YOU to get on Twitter and ask Jackson the questions on your mind regarding domestic violence, male culture, gender violence, really, anything you want.

Ask him what we can do to stop victim blaming in cases of sexual assault, violence, and abuse; ask him who his favorite activist is; ask him how to talk to someone who is making degrading or sexist comments; ask him what he hopes for future generations; ask him whatever your heart desires.

Follow the whole chat using the hashtag #TEDxChat or check out our feed on @TEDx.

We hope you’ll join us today at 3 PM EST!