NEWSFLASH: The newest Disney princess (Anna from Frozen) has eyes bigger than her wrists.
Yep — thanks to work by sociologist Philip N. Cohen — we can now chew on that fact for a while.
While cartoons certainly aren’t the number one source for realistic portrayals of the human form, Cohen’s work finds surprising patterns in the way Disney films portray male and female characters‘ bodies. Male characters boast hands that dwarf female counterparts, and female leads have eyes sometimes twice the size of their male partner — trends that romanticize wide-eyed innocence for girls and strength and dominance for boys.
Mr. Cohen isn’t the only person disrupting our ideas on popular kids’ movies. Last year, TEDxBeaconStreet’s own Colin Stokes gave this fascinating talk on how movies teach manhood, which totally challenged how we look at gender in kids’ movies. 
Over at the TED Blog, Colin unpacks the messages he sees in more movies that are favorites for kids — and recommends some great picks for enlightened watching. Here’s a sampling:

Movie formula: The QuestTypical Version: A boy’s world is threatened by an evil male force. He must train and mobilize other boys to defeat the enemy in a violent conflict. There is essentially one female, who is granted to the hero as a prize.Examples: Star Wars, The Hobbit, The Lion King—-Enlightened version: A boy or girl (or team) seeks to heal an injustice in the world. They must make friends who share their goal to change the culture of an older generation, by modeling a better way.Examples: The Wizard of Oz, The Muppet Movie, The Dark Crystal, Castle in the Sky (Japan), Spy Kids 1 & 2, Tangled

Read his whole guide here» 
(Photo: Flickr user Dollyclaire)

NEWSFLASH: The newest Disney princess (Anna from Frozen) has eyes bigger than her wrists.

Yep — thanks to work by sociologist Philip N. Cohen — we can now chew on that fact for a while.

While cartoons certainly aren’t the number one source for realistic portrayals of the human form, Cohen’s work finds surprising patterns in the way Disney films portray male and female characters‘ bodies. Male characters boast hands that dwarf female counterparts, and female leads have eyes sometimes twice the size of their male partner — trends that romanticize wide-eyed innocence for girls and strength and dominance for boys.

Mr. Cohen isn’t the only person disrupting our ideas on popular kids’ movies. Last year, TEDxBeaconStreet’s own Colin Stokes gave this fascinating talk on how movies teach manhood, which totally challenged how we look at gender in kids’ movies.

Over at the TED Blog, Colin unpacks the messages he sees in more movies that are favorites for kids — and recommends some great picks for enlightened watching. Here’s a sampling:

Movie formula: The Quest
Typical Version:
A boy’s world is threatened by an evil male force. He must train and mobilize other boys to defeat the enemy in a violent conflict. There is essentially one female, who is granted to the hero as a prize.
ExamplesStar Wars, The Hobbit, The Lion King
—-
Enlightened version: A boy or girl (or team) seeks to heal an injustice in the world. They must make friends who share their goal to change the culture of an older generation, by modeling a better way.
Examples:
The Wizard of Oz, The Muppet Movie, The Dark Crystal, Castle in the Sky (Japan), Spy Kids 1 & 2, Tangled

Read his whole guide here»

(Photo: Flickr user Dollyclaire)

Watch the whole talk here»

This guy stopped watching porn — and he wants you to know why. Gender activist Ran Gavrieli felt that most of the images he saw in porn encouraged negative, even violent, attitudes toward women, despite a recent wave of feminist porn. So he pulled the plug, and found that his personal sex life and private fantasies became much more fulfilling.

In his talk at TEDxJaffa, he advocates for physically and emotionally-safe sex, as well as erotica that shows a wider range of fulfilling sexual experiences — including the intimacy of human connection, laughter, and touch. Watch his talk here.


"Transforming cultural ideas of manhood is the most important step in reducing violence in the world." - anti-sexism activist Jackson Katz during yesterday’s #TEDxChat 

Thank you to everyone who joined our #TEDxChat with Jackson Katz yesterday to discuss how men can help prevent domestic violence. We loved all of your thoughtful, intelligent comments! 
A ton of people chimed in for the conversation — you are all amazing, thank you!! — and we want to send a special thanks to upworthy, bustmagazine, and hollaback for joining us! 
Two of our favorite comments from you all after yesterday’s chat:


We hope the conversation gave you something to think about, and thank you again for bringing all your fabulous brains and ideas. 

"Transforming cultural ideas of manhood is the most important step in reducing violence in the world." - anti-sexism activist Jackson Katz during yesterday’s #TEDxChat 

Thank you to everyone who joined our #TEDxChat with Jackson Katz yesterday to discuss how men can help prevent domestic violence. We loved all of your thoughtful, intelligent comments! 

A ton of people chimed in for the conversation — you are all amazing, thank you!! — and we want to send a special thanks to upworthy, bustmagazine, and hollaback for joining us! 

Two of our favorite comments from you all after yesterday’s chat:

We hope the conversation gave you something to think about, and thank you again for bringing all your fabulous brains and ideas.