Watching the TEDxYouth@Amman Livestream

TEDxYouthDay was a day of firsts for me:

  1. First time watching a livestreamed TEDx event
  2. First time watching a livestreamed TEDxYouth event
  3. First time hearing the word “Educativity” from TEDxYouth@Amman
  4. First time live reporting over the Internet

The first event I watched was TEDxYouth@Amman. I watched the livestream between 11:00PM and 9AM although I did manage to get a few hours of sleep during the scheduled breaks. The event itself was incredible.

I got to see how TEDx events bring the ideals of TED, “ideas worth spreading,” to a broader audience around the world. At TEDxYouth@Amman, the theme was “Educativity,” which each speaker addressed in his or her own way. The speakers at TEDxYouth@Amman were amazing and many of them broadened my world view! Here were some of my favorites:

1. A Jordanian dance group that performed at the end of the TEDxYouth@Amman blew my mind. I love that TEDx events don’t just stick to the standard conference format of having someone stand up on a stage and talk, and allow for the program to integrate this type of performance. There were more than 20 young people on the stage, each doing a different style of ballet, hip-hop, and other dance forms, but the choreography made the piece come together.

2. Ward Wakileh, a slam poet, nearly brought tears to my eyes. He presented his idea of school, and how “Educativity” can help those who are out of the box when it comes to the standard model of learning. He shared his own frustrations from his experiences as a student in the classic school environment. He concluded by showing us that he figured out how he learns best, and that he has continued to learn through this process throughout his life. He views this process as “Educativity” and described it as an environment where creativity is integrated with education to enhance learning. He believes it’s the future of classrooms around the world.

There were many more speakers who inspired me to take a new perspective on education and how it can meld with creativity. After all, they are two similar concepts! Thank you, TEDxYouth@Amman, for broadening my horizons, and leaving me with an brain overloaded with “idea’s worth spreading.”

By Adi Davis, an official TEDxYouthDay viewing party reporter.

Ayd Asraf is an official TEDxYouthDay reporter for TEDxYouth@Amman, one of 100 TEDxYouthDay events happening between November 19 - 21, 2011, around Universal Children’s Day.
Being part of and contributing to TEDxYouthDay, an amazing global phenomenon, is something that comes with lots of fun and responsibility. One of the fun journeys I went through was providing an Arabic subtitle translation for the official TEDxYouthDay introduction video.
The journey began when I was surfing the TEDxYouthDay website, looking for latest news and activities. I found the very creative introduction video, which introduces TED, TEDx, and TEDxYouthDay to the public. There was also a request beneath it for those who are interested in providing subtitle translations in their local languages.  Knowing that lots of Arab youth are deeply interested in TEDx and TEDxYouth events,  and knowing that nine TEDxYouthDay events are being held in the Middle East and North Africa region, I felt compelled to provide an Arabic translation for the video and its message for all young people who are inspired by TEDx and TEDxYouthDay events.
To do the translation, I watched the video over and over again, with my notebook beside me and my pen in hand. I wrote my initial translation, trying to improve it with every replay. After creating a very satisfying version, I read about making the subtitle files and how they synchronize with video. Applying the what I learned about subtitle files, with the help of family and friends, I worked through the challenging process of properly timing the subtitles with the audio in the video.
After reaching the final version, I emailed the results to the TED staff and TEDxYouth@Amman team. Seeing these subtitles available online made my day — it was the sweetest repay for my work, and I felt so happy that my efforts were appreciated.
In my opinion, the essence of volunteer work is the concept that life is not only about money. There are many other amazing things to be gained as a payment for effort, such as appreciation, knowledge, publicity, influence, and most importantly, knowing yourself by constantly motivating and challenging yourself to do things you never thought you were capable of doing.

Ayd Asraf is an official TEDxYouthDay reporter for TEDxYouth@Amman, one of 100 TEDxYouthDay events happening between November 19 - 21, 2011, around Universal Children’s Day.

Being part of and contributing to TEDxYouthDay, an amazing global phenomenon, is something that comes with lots of fun and responsibility. One of the fun journeys I went through was providing an Arabic subtitle translation for the official TEDxYouthDay introduction video.

The journey began when I was surfing the TEDxYouthDay website, looking for latest news and activities. I found the very creative introduction video, which introduces TED, TEDx, and TEDxYouthDay to the public. There was also a request beneath it for those who are interested in providing subtitle translations in their local languages. Knowing that lots of Arab youth are deeply interested in TEDx and TEDxYouth events, and knowing that nine TEDxYouthDay events are being held in the Middle East and North Africa region, I felt compelled to provide an Arabic translation for the video and its message for all young people who are inspired by TEDx and TEDxYouthDay events.

To do the translation, I watched the video over and over again, with my notebook beside me and my pen in hand. I wrote my initial translation, trying to improve it with every replay. After creating a very satisfying version, I read about making the subtitle files and how they synchronize with video. Applying the what I learned about subtitle files, with the help of family and friends, I worked through the challenging process of properly timing the subtitles with the audio in the video.

After reaching the final version, I emailed the results to the TED staff and TEDxYouth@Amman team. Seeing these subtitles available online made my day — it was the sweetest repay for my work, and I felt so happy that my efforts were appreciated.

In my opinion, the essence of volunteer work is the concept that life is not only about money. There are many other amazing things to be gained as a payment for effort, such as appreciation, knowledge, publicity, influence, and most importantly, knowing yourself by constantly motivating and challenging yourself to do things you never thought you were capable of doing.

TEDxYouth@Amman: Educativity

Reposted from the TEDxYouth@Amman blog.

Educativity: First Point of Change! 

The TEDxYouth@Amman 2011 theme is “Educativity”! Most of us have read or come to the conclusion that this structure is built out of the two words “education” and “creativity,” but what is the logic behind this combination? Is this a newly created concept or not? What would we expect from this theme? And what is our role as youth in forming this concept within our societies? All of this and more will be discussed in this post.

What is Educativity?

In very simple words, it’s the ability to merge the inputs, the processes, and the outcomes of both creativity and education. It’s the area where our educational systems utilize and emphasize our creativity in every aspect. We can also have a definition for “Educativity” as the ability for education to influence and shape lives, attitudes, and methodologies for the people being educated — forcing them to come up with new, creative, and original ideas for solutions or prevention plans for current problems.

History of Educativity

According to my research, the term “Educativity” started to appear and spread worldwide in conjunction with the World Economic Crisis in late 2007. Since that date we have seen the expression discussed in books, articles, and blogs repeatedly. Given the context, it is logical that this term emerged, because the only way to recover from the effects of this kind of crisis is to think creatively and create new, flexible, and original ideas that can push through the current situation.

TEDx and Educativity

The TEDxYouth@Amman team recognizes the importance of reflecting the concept of “Educativity” in our local community, especially given that there are so many creative minds and diverse abilities all around us. Sadly, we face the same problems as everyone else: our educational system kills our innovation and creativity. So the TEDxYouth@Amman team enthusiastically searched all over the country to find speakers and performers who have both the will to challenge their reality, environments, and educational systems in every respect, as well as the ability to create new values and methods in their communities.

Why the Youth Edition?

Jordan and the Arab world in general are blessed with a population dominated in numbers by youth. Taking this into consideration leads to the most logical conclusion: making change in the idealism within youth themselves will lead to change throughout our society. The youth has the potential and the energy to carry, deliver, and spread messages nationwide on both practical and theoretical levels.

Final Words

From my prior experience with TEDx events, I have true faith in their ability to inspire and make positive change within our souls. I myself have had this type of experience at TEDx events in the past. I am very excited to meet all of the youth at TEDxYouth@Amman, and to learn and be inspired by people who are younger than I am. I really believe that “Our Ideas Are Always Worth Spreading.”

By Ayd Mahdy Asraf, reposted from the TEDxYouth@Amman blog.

Swimming next to every TEDxDeadSea logo is a cartoon red and white fish with the phrase “No fish here. Only ideas worth spreading.” Where did this fish come from? How did he become the official mascot and image of TEDxDeadSea? Organizer Zeid Abdul-Hadi explains:

How did you come up with the tagline “No fish here. Only ideas worth spreading”?

The tagline of the event was inspired by the location of the event itself, the Dead Sea. Since the Dead Sea has no life in it whatsoever due to its salty composition and TED and TEDx is all about “Ideas worth spreading” - it was a nice idea to combine the tagline of TEDx and the nature of the location so that everyone coming to the event would know that this is not a sea with fish, but a sea with “Ideas worth spreading”. The name sentence itself was suggested to us by one Baha Abu Nojaim of our Technology Partner Company, Mixed Dimensions.

What was your TEDxDeadSea brand strategy?  What was your inspiration?

This question is answered by our Branding Partner, NDProductions

In order to deliver a message, to spread a word or to seek a goal, there is always a need for a medium; this is our main idea behind our concept for the TEDxDeadSea branding.

TEDx is all about exploring and exposing new ideas, new innovation, creative minds, entrepreneurs, etc… therefore we have symbolized the medium of spreading those words in red pipelines.

The reason behind choosing the red pipeline motif for TEDxDeadSea branding is that pipelines are flexible, and can be custom made depending on what content it is delivering, and it can be extended to reach wherever location it is intended to reach, which we believe is the core concept of the TEDx event. The color and the feel of the pipelines is inspired by the general feel of the TEDx logo.

The general look and feel of the branding is simple, elegant and classy; the overall theme and colors (red, black and white) is inspired by the TEDx identity.

How did you decide on the theme?

The theme of the event was “Education, Creativity and Entrepreneurship” and we felt that these were three very important subjects/topics to focus on at Jordan’s first TEDx event.

Why did you decide to enlist the help of an outside branding company?  What were the benefits?  Would you recommend this to other organizers?

Because we wanted to expand the range of ideas for the branding of this event and we wanted young and creative minds to work with us. We used NDProductions — the benefits were that the the three partners of this branding company with ages ranging from 25 - 27 presented us with amazing ideas with great enthusiasm and creativity and dedicated themselves entirely to our event.

What are some tips you can give to other TEDx organizers?

Think creatively and out of the box about branding for your events.