Fake it ’til you become it: How your body language shapes who you areIn a talk at TEDGlobal 2012, social psychologist Amy Cuddy offered a free, low-tech lifehack: assume a posture for just two minutes — and change your life.
Above, designers from the Brazilian magazine Superinteressante illustrated some of the points Cuddy makes about body language (You can see the image in all its wonderful detail here.) and its impact on how we feel. Take a look … and stand up straight.
Watch the whole talk here»
(From our friends at the TED Blog)

Fake it ’til you become it: How your body language shapes who you are

In a talk at TEDGlobal 2012, social psychologist Amy Cuddy offered a free, low-tech lifehack: assume a posture for just two minutes — and change your life.

Above, designers from the Brazilian magazine Superinteressante illustrated some of the points Cuddy makes about body language (You can see the image in all its wonderful detail here.) and its impact on how we feel. Take a look … and stand up straight.

Watch the whole talk here»

(From our friends at the TED Blog)

Hackers are innovators. Hackers are people who challenge and change the system to make them work differently—make them work better. It’s just how they think. It’s a mindset. I’m growing up in a world that needs more people with the hacker mindset, and not just for technology. Everything is up for being hacked.
13-year-old hackmaster Logan LaPlante discusses how “hackschooling” — taking a hackers’ approach to education — helps him to take full control of his education in his TEDxUniversityofNevada talk, "Hackschooling Makes Me Happy."

[A large scale of Americans were asked, “Looking back over the past 6 months, who are the people with whom you discussed matters important to you?” in 1985 and 2004.] The percentage of Americans who list a friend, a sibling, a coworker, a co-member of a group, or a neighbor as a close confidant — who have at least one member of those social categories that is an actual confidant — has plummeted on the order of 30-60% over the course of 19 years in our very recent history.

The percentage of Americans in 1985 who listed a co-member of a group as a close confidant was 26.1%. By 2004, that number had plummeted to 11.8% … In 1985, 18.5% of Americans had at least one neighbor who was a close confidant. By 2004, that number had plummeted to 7.9%

…More and more of us are increasingly dependent, increasingly focused on the spousal relationship at the expense of this much broader social milieu we used to have, [so] keeping a high quality marriage when we’re putting so much stock in this one relationship is crucial.

…Most people, when they think about intervening in their marriage, think about marital therapy. That’s fine, except that most people — when they think about marital therapy — they view it as the final stopgap procedure that you use because you’re about to divorce. They say, ‘Well, gosh, it’s been 15 years and I’ve sort of hated you all this time and now we’re thinking about divorce, let’s go see somebody about that.’ That is the wrong time, the wrong time to seek marital therapy because you’ve developed terrible patterns … you’ve developed scar tissue created from hurt and anger and frustration.

I want to suggest that the right time to intervene is earlier.

Eli Finkel, in his TEDxUChicago talk, "The hack to save your marriage."

In his talk, social scientist Finkel sheds light on an overwhelmingly simple step that couples can take to maybe save their relationships — something he calls, “the marriage hack.” Watch his whole talk here.