Mars rover Curiosity captures a solar eclipse …. from Mars

Many of us have seen images of the moon eclipse the sun, but it’s not so often that one sees the sun eclipsed by a moon that is not our own. Yet just a few weeks ago, the telephoto-lens camera of NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover saw just that: Mars’s moon Phobos eclipsing the sun.

On August 17, Curiosity snapped a series of photos of Mars’s larger moon, Phobos, “dash in front of the sun,” as Reuters put it. These photos are now considered to be the clearest photos of a Mars solar eclipse ever taken.

Above, at top, you can see three of Curiosity’s photos of Phobos’s solar eclipse, and below, Curiosity’s documentation of Phobos passing directly in front of Mars’s other moon, Deimos.

As we all wait for more information, discoveries, and super cool photos from the world’s most powerful rover to land on Mars, learn more about Mars thanks to these 4 TEDx Talks about the Red Planet:

How we landed a car on Mars: Jordan Evans at TEDxMidAtlantic
In this talk from TEDxMidAtlantic, Jordan Evans, Engineering Development and Operations Manager for the Mars rover Curiosity project explains what it was like to be behind the scenes as the rover landed on Mars, making sure one of the greatest achievements in the history of space exploration was a success.

Why is there water on Earth? Why not Mars?: Maria Sundin at TEDxUniversityofGothenburg
In this talk, astrophysicist Maria Sundin discusses the importance of water to supporting life on our planet — and possibly others — and provides us with a look into the surprisingly watery history of our neighbor planet, Mars, a history which could have maybe included life.

No life on Mars? No problem; we’ll bring it: Bas Lansdorp at TEDxDelft
Bas Lansdorp is the head of the Mars One project, an endeavor to establish a human settlement on the planet Mars in 2023. At TEDxDelft, he lays out the project’s plan for a manned mission to Mars, explaining the drive behind this very ambitious goal.

Live like a rocket scientist: Charles Elachi at TEDxBeirut
Charles Elachi is the director of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the outlet responsible for the Mars Science Laboratory, which launched and maintains Mars rover Curiosity. Just 100 days after Curiosity's landing, he spoke at TEDxBeirut about how a sense of curiosity and a willingness to collaborate drive not only missions to Mars, but also all great things in life.

(Photos: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems/Texas A&M Univ.)

Mars Rover Curiosity takes a tour of Mars (Photo: NASA)
TEDx playlist: 4 TEDx Talks to celebrate Curiosity's new discovery
Yesterday, NASA announced an amazing finding from its Mars Curiosity rover  — evidence of conditions once suitable for life on the Red Planet.
Says NASA:

Scientists identified sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and carbon — some of the key chemical ingredients for life — in the powder Curiosity drilled out of a sedimentary rock near an ancient stream bed in Gale Crater on the Red Planet last month.
"A fundamental question for this mission is whether Mars could have supported a habitable environment," said Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA’s Mars Exploration Program at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. "From what we know now, the answer is yes." 

As we all wait with baited breath for more groundbreaking (pun intended) discoveries from the world’s most powerful rover to land on Mars, celebrate this incredible discovery with 4 TEDx Talks about the Red Planet:

How we landed a car on Mars: Jordan Evans at TEDxMidAtlanticIn this talk from TEDxMidAtlantic, Jordan Evans, Engineering Development and Operations Manager for the Mars Rover Curiosity project explains what it was like to be behind the scenes as the rover landed on Mars, making sure one of the greatest achievements in the history of space exploration was a success.

Why is there water on Earth? Why not Mars?: Maria Sundin at TEDxUniversityofGothenburgIn this talk, astrophysicist Maria Sundin discusses the importance of water to supporting life on our planet — and possibly others — and provides us with a look into the surprisingly watery history of our neighbor planet, Mars, a history which could have maybe included life.

No life on Mars? No problem; we’ll bring it: Bas Lansdorp at TEDxDelftBas Lansdorp is the head of the Mars One project, an endeavor to establish a human settlement on the planet Mars in 2023. At TEDxDelft, he lays out the project’s plan for a manned mission to Mars, explaining the drive behind this very ambitious goal.

Live like a rocket scientist: Charles Elachi at TEDxBeirutCharles Elachi is the director of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the outlet responsible for the Mars Science Laboratory, which launched and maintains Mars rover Curiosity. Just 100 days after Curiosity’s landing, he spoke at TEDxBeirut about how a sense of curiosity and a willingness to collaborate drive not only missions to Mars, but also all great things in life.
And a bonus — with absolutely no relation to TEDx — David Bowie’s seminal hit, “Life on Mars”:

Mars Rover Curiosity takes a tour of Mars (Photo: NASA)

TEDx playlist: 4 TEDx Talks to celebrate Curiosity's new discovery

Yesterday, NASA announced an amazing finding from its Mars Curiosity rover — evidence of conditions once suitable for life on the Red Planet.

Says NASA:

Scientists identified sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and carbon — some of the key chemical ingredients for life — in the powder Curiosity drilled out of a sedimentary rock near an ancient stream bed in Gale Crater on the Red Planet last month.

"A fundamental question for this mission is whether Mars could have supported a habitable environment," said Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA’s Mars Exploration Program at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. "From what we know now, the answer is yes."

As we all wait with baited breath for more groundbreaking (pun intended) discoveries from the world’s most powerful rover to land on Mars, celebrate this incredible discovery with 4 TEDx Talks about the Red Planet:

How we landed a car on Mars: Jordan Evans at TEDxMidAtlantic
In this talk from TEDxMidAtlantic, Jordan Evans, Engineering Development and Operations Manager for the Mars Rover Curiosity project explains what it was like to be behind the scenes as the rover landed on Mars, making sure one of the greatest achievements in the history of space exploration was a success.

Why is there water on Earth? Why not Mars?: Maria Sundin at TEDxUniversityofGothenburg
In this talk, astrophysicist Maria Sundin discusses the importance of water to supporting life on our planet — and possibly others — and provides us with a look into the surprisingly watery history of our neighbor planet, Mars, a history which could have maybe included life.

No life on Mars? No problem; we’ll bring it: Bas Lansdorp at TEDxDelft
Bas Lansdorp is the head of the Mars One project, an endeavor to establish a human settlement on the planet Mars in 2023. At TEDxDelft, he lays out the project’s plan for a manned mission to Mars, explaining the drive behind this very ambitious goal.

Live like a rocket scientist: Charles Elachi at TEDxBeirut
Charles Elachi is the director of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the outlet responsible for the Mars Science Laboratory, which launched and maintains Mars rover Curiosity. Just 100 days after Curiosity’s landing, he spoke at TEDxBeirut about how a sense of curiosity and a willingness to collaborate drive not only missions to Mars, but also all great things in life.

And a bonus — with absolutely no relation to TEDx — David Bowie’s seminal hit, “Life on Mars”:

The Higgs Boson, breaking the sound barrier, Occupy Wall Street, oh my! — 9 TEDx Talks to remember 2012

2012 saw major advances in science, remarkable feats of human achievement, and sea-changes in politics, international conflict, and human relations. These nine talks should help you frame the essential ideas that shaped events this past year.

The Higgs Boson: What You Don’t Know: Dr. Dan Hooper at TEDxNaperville

Earlier this year, CERN uncovered overwhelming evidence pointing toward the discovery of the elusive Higgs-Boson particle — providing experimental backing for some of the most fundamental theories in physics. Dan Hooper explains what makes this discovery so special. (Filmed at TEDxNaperville.)

STRATOS - The longest free fall in history: Dr. Jon Clark at TEDxUSC

On October 14, 2012, Felix Baumgartner lept off a ledge 39,045 meters in the air, broke the sound barrier, and landed safely on the ground. Dr. Jon Clark worked on the suit that helped Felix survive. Watch the talk to find out how he did it. (Filmed at TEDxUSC.)

The aftermath of Occupy: Naomi Colvin at TEDxHousesofParliament

Last year, the Occupy Wall Street movement spread like wildfire across the globe. This year, members have struggled with critics who dismiss the campaign for its inability to articulate specific demands. Naomi Colvin thinks they miss the point entirely; that the protests were not about rushing into specific negotiations based on conventional principles, but about disrupting the way we reform altogether. In this reflective talk, she lays out a new vision of political identity. (Filmed at TEDxHousesofParliament.)

Be optimistic about the US and China: Geoffrey Garrett at TEDxSydney

When, in April of this year, civil rights activist Chen Guangcheng fled from house arrest to seek asylum at the US embassy in Beijing, the US and China faced a delicate situation that challenged both countries’ policies and basic ethics.  Geoffrey Garrett believes that because the issue was resolved with relative ease — he can outline a vision of the future where these codependent superpowers can peaceably exist. (Filmed at TEDxSydney.)

What are your universal rights?: Philippe Sands at TEDxHousesofParliament

In addition to leaving thousands and countless homeless, the ongoing conflict in Syria has tried international stability — forcing every nation to reflect on its philosophy of intervention. In a call for consistent international conduct, Philippe Sands reframes intervention as a moral issue. He makes the case that no government should be free to abuse its citizens, that the rights of individuals supersede those of the state and that those rights must be protected by a powerful international force. (Filmed at TEDxHousesofParliament.)

Fixing election coverage: Jay Rosen at TEDxColumbiaEngineering 

In November, America re-elected Barack Obama. But before they could do that, they were inundated with a barrage of press coverage, most of which, according to Jay Rosen, wasn’t very helpful. In this talk, he lays out the problems with the press’s election coverage and offers a simple fix. (Filmed at TEDxColumbiaEngineering.)

How Curiosity Changed My Life, and I Changed Hers: Adam Steltzner atTEDxNewEngland

Aside from representing a major achievement in science, engineering, and the exploration of space, the Curiosity rover is simply, incredibly cool. Adam Steltzner, landing lead for the Curiosity rover, explains how NASA got a 1-ton SUV onto Mars. (Filmed at TEDxNewEngland.)

Hate Speech Beyond Borders: Nazila Ghanea at TEDxEastEnd

In September, a hate-filled video posted to YouTube sparked a slew of violent protests across the Arab world and left serious questions about how cultures of free speech can peaceably coexist with cultures of censorship. Oxford professor of International Human Rights Law, Nazila Ghanea, gives us a look into the wider international picture of contemporary hate speech and the nature of the violence it incurs. (Filmed at TEDxEastEnd.)

A History of Violence:  Steven Pinker atTEDxNewEngland

Several times this year, headlines described traumatic, violent events. But, through it all, it’s essential to remember that we live in the least violent time in history, says philosopher Steven Pinker. In this talk, he breaks down the numbers behind the decline of violence and lays out his expectations for the future of conflict. (Filmed at TEDxNewEngland.)