It’s a Pollock, it’s a Haring; it’s a person! — How one photographer transforms people into art: Veteran photographer Art Wolfe has spent years documenting everything from landscapes in Madagascar to the art of the Maori tribe. In his newest series, The Human Canvas Project, he draws from his experience as a painter to blend the human form seamlessly into his images.

In a talk at TEDxRainier, Wolfe gives insight into his evolution as a photographer, and just how he transforms a regular person into a work of art.

Watch the whole talk here»

Ferrofluids, how do they work? Above, TEDx speaker Fabian Oefner paints with ferrofluids and a magnet. 

This year at TEDGlobal, a crazy scene unfolded. Photographer/artist/TEDxWarwick speaker/science geek Fabian Oefner took to the stage with a magnet, plate, syringes, some watercolors, and … ferrofluid.

What’s ferrofluid? Ferrofluid is a type of strongly magnetic liquid that, when manipulated with magnets, does some crazy things — like build spikes, bubble up, and cluster into geometric patterns — all thanks to the attraction and the repulsion of the liquid’s individual particles, as Fabian explains in his talk, "Psychedelic science."

Taking it a step further, Fabian added regular old watercolors to the magic magnetic gloop, and showed how, like oil, water and ferrofluid do not mix. "It doesn’t mix with the water," he says in his talk, "and at the same time, it tries to maintain its position above the magnet, and therefore, it creates those amazing-looking structures of channels and tiny little ponds of colorful water paint."

Amazing, indeed. A+, science.


"A visit to a museum is a search for beauty, truth, and meaning in our lives. Go to museums as often as you can." - artist Maira Kalman at TEDxMet

We had a wonderful time at TEDxMet at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Saturday! The stellar lineup included neuroscientist Eric Kandel, writer Andrew Solomon, and legendary choreographer Bill T. Jones.  
We’ll share the videos as soon as they’re posted, but in the meantime, one of our favorite quotes from the day.

"A visit to a museum is a search for beauty, truth, and meaning in our lives. Go to museums as often as you can." - artist Maira Kalman at TEDxMet

We had a wonderful time at TEDxMet at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Saturday! The stellar lineup included neuroscientist Eric Kandel, writer Andrew Solomon, and legendary choreographer Bill T. Jones.  

We’ll share the videos as soon as they’re posted, but in the meantime, one of our favorite quotes from the day.

What’s the newest thing going on at the Metropolitan Museum of Art? TEDx, natch.

This Saturday, Met curators will join folks like Nobel laureate/neuroscientist Eric R. Kandel; master illustrator Maira Kalman (whose TED talk is just lovely); journalist Andrew Solomon; and newly-named 2013 MacArthur Fellow Kyle Abraham at TEDxMet, a day of talks, performances, and other snazzy things at the venerable art museum.

To prepare for the event, the TEDxMet curators asked their speakers and performers,"What’s your favorite work of art at the Met?" They chose some classic pieces and some hidden gems. Below, a few of the TEDxMet speakers’ favorite pieces in the Met collection:


Pieter Bruegel the Elder (Netherlandish, ca. 1525–1569) | The Harvesters | 1565 

Museum Director Tom Campbell chose Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s The Harvesters, “for its timeless and vivid portrait of humanity.”


Bovine (Boli) | 19th–20th century | Bamana peoples, Mali

Choreographer: Bill T. Jones chose The Bamana ‘Boli’ mud bull because, he says, “[it] is always moving for the primal power it emits and, though the Modern collection has deepened, it remains an island of contrast in the Met’s collections, which I love to move through as a sort of ‘refresher’ for my eyes, and the apparatus that reads concept before aesthetics.”


Goya (Francisco de Goya y Lucientes) (Spanish, 1746–1828) | Giant | 1818 

And TEDMed talker and writer Andrew Solomon chose Goya’s Giant, at which we cannot stop staring.

(Above — Met curator Andrew Bolton’s favorite: Alexander McQueen’s Ensemble; choreographer/dancer Kyle Abraham’s favorite, El Anatsui’s Dusasa II (Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY); and composer Meredith Monk’s favorite: The Temple of Dendur)