Six striking TEDxCity2.0 posters to look out for this Saturday

October 13’s day of urban inspiration is not without its visual inspiration. As evidence, we’ve put together this list of six TEDxCity2.0 graphics not to be missed. Below, six amazing graphics celebrating cities across the globe:


First up, TEDxSantoDomingo in the Dominican Republic, whose City 2.0 poster certainly wins for cutest design: whoever knew urban architecture could be so adorable?

After the jump, 5 more favorites!

Read More

TEDxMargalla in Islamabad, Pakistan sends over this quote from former mayor of Bogota, Enrique Penalosa, in anticipation of their TEDxCity2.0 event on the 13th."City 2.0 to me and my community is a re-invention of our homeland," says organizer Saad Hamid. “A city where our kids can play, not just with toys, but with ideas. A city where we work, not just to earn, but to learn. A city where the city talks to us, breathes, lives and interacts with us just like a human.”To celebrate innovation in the world’s cities, TEDxMargalla has created a very captivating Facebook album, City2.0, filled with images depicting urban inspiration throughout the globe.

TEDxMargalla in Islamabad, Pakistan sends over this quote from former mayor of Bogota, Enrique Penalosa, in anticipation of their TEDxCity2.0 event on the 13th.

"City 2.0 to me and my community is a re-invention of our homeland," says organizer Saad Hamid. “A city where our kids can play, not just with toys, but with ideas. A city where we work, not just to earn, but to learn. A city where the city talks to us, breathes, lives and interacts with us just like a human.”

To celebrate innovation in the world’s cities, TEDxMargalla has created a very captivating Facebook album, City2.0, filled with images depicting urban inspiration throughout the globe.

A first for his team, TEDxRawalLake organizer Salman Saeed was overwhelmed by the success of his recent salon event. He praised attendees for their passion, interest, and inquisitiveness, and for their dedication to pursuing Ideas Worth Spreading in Pakistan.

Shereen El-Feki’s TEDTalk, “HIV — how to fight an epidemic of bad laws,” was shown, and, immediately, discussion was sparked.

"Great controversies arose among the audience," said Salman. "By the end of the talk, [people were asking], if a person [can be] deported from a county on the basis that the disease would not spread after deporting the person, what if it happened in our own country, Pakistan? Could the spreading of AIDS stop by this solution?”

Soon, an interest in HIV and AIDS education was inspired, and “any reasons were discussed that proved that AIDS can’t be spread by living with the person,” Salman reported. “People living together in jails; students studying in universities; office colleagues; workers in factories.”

"[HIV spreading] precaution measures were also discussed," said Salman, "especially [from the] Islamic point of view—[asking] why Islam doesn’t allow certain acts that can lead into spreading incurable diseases."

"The main purpose of the discussion was to turn the idea into action," he said, “and we were successful in achieving it. The idea worth spreading that was shared by the end of discussion was that a conference should be held where great Islamic scholars would be called to discuss the issues regarding unwanted acts in Islam and the reasons of why they are not accepted in order to spread awareness. This was the beauty of ideas worth spreading.”

The TEDxRawalLakeSalon audience was also treated to a performance from Usman Riaz, filmed during TEDGlobal 2012, and the TEDxRawalLake team informed interested TEDx’ers that he is slated to perform at the next TEDxRawalLake event.

During registration, attendees were given cards that read, “x is coming to Islamabad,” and were asked to write an “Idea Worth Spreading” on their card. At the end of the event, Salman said, “the best 4 ideas among all were selected and [those chosen] were called upon the stage to discuss those ideas with the audience,” furthering the discussion of ideas important to the Islamabad and Pakistani community.

After the event, TEDxRawalLakeSalon hosted a discussion and networking session, where inspired TEDx’ers were invited to talk, make connections and digest both refreshments and new ideas.

Submitted by Salman Saeed, TEDxRawalLake organizer.

For months, TEDxMargalla organizer Saad Hamid and a few of his friends have been volunteering at Pehli Kiran, a school in an impoverished area of Islamabad, Pakistan.
Not a trained teacher, Saad’s work at the school has always had a bent toward the practical. “It wasn’t possible for us to teach the kids regular subjects like Mathematics, English, Science,” he told TEDx, “so instead we had to resort to teaching them [the things] we know best, i.e. arts and crafts, painting, making use of objects for domestic survival, low cost food preparation, etc.”

Wanting the students he worked with to develop a deeper understanding of their community and the world around them, Saad decided to organize a TEDx event tailored to the students’ wants
. “It wouldn’t be possible to invite these kids to our regular TEDx events as [they] are very young and their minds are still developing,” he said, "therefore we thought, ‘how amazing it would be if we brought TEDx to the kids instead of taking the kids to a regular TEDx event?’"



Thus, TEDxKids@Islamabad was born. When the idea of creating their own TEDx event was presented to the kids, Saad said, “lots of kids came to us and said that they want to ‘discover’ something [new] at TEDxKids. Things like, importance of trees in environment, history of Pakistan, understanding arts and animation, a musical tour of Pakistan. The theme ‘Aao bacho sair karain’ (translates into ‘Hey kids, let’s discover! [the world]) was carefully selected, [and] keeping their [interests] in mind, we arranged the right speakers/performers for the kids.”

Saad soon discovered that organizing TEDxKids@Islamabad was a completely different experience than that of any event he’d taken on before. “It [was] an all-kids-audience…and it [had] to be organised at the kids’ school, which is in a little remote area of Islamabad,” he said, “so this was quite a challenge that we agreed upon to take and then accomplished.”

Saad wanted TEDxKids@Islamabad to empower these students to be leaders in their community. “[We] had two main objectives with TEDxKids@Islamabad,” he said. “1. To prove that education can be fun [and] 2. To shift focus to ‘kids’ and realising that they are indeed architects of the future.”

"TEDxKids, for the kids," said Saad, "was an opportunity to design an event of their dreams. It was all about what they wanted and we were there to provide any logistical or other form of support that they required."

In between, the activities and speakers’ talks, several students gave one minute talks about a story they particularly love. “This was not recorded, since kids felt a little shy,” said Saad, “so the main rehearsed talks…were only done by adult speakers.”

The most memorable moment of TEDxKids@Islamabad came during one of the musical performances. “Apart from our great speakers,” Saad said, “we arranged a whole pool of talented artists…painters, guitarists, folk-musicians and dancers.

"During the performance from Umair Jaffar," Saad said, "small groups of students stood up and started dancing as soon as they recognised tunes of their local folk music."

"It was something that I term as "diversity, unified." Kids from different parts of Pakistan—yet they sat together and as one. It was magical.

"[As all non-TED talks were presented in Urdu] TEDxKids@Islamabad was an opportunity for us to create local TEDx content in our language, which will later be shown to kids in schools in Islamabad and even all around Pakistan," said Saad. "TEDxKids@Islamabad [is] the first step in achieving a grand milestone of making education fun for kids and recognising their role for a better future…I learned from TEDxKids that TEDTalks, or TEDx Talks, for that matter, are the future of lectures in classrooms, especially in developing countries."